That’s It!


After one year of running this website, I have decided to finish my competition. I give a huge thank you to all participants but I am also very sorry to all of you who would like to continue solving puzzles. I particularly thank Mark Bishop, Paul Cleary and Richard Zapor for sending in puzzle submissions. Here are the top five participants for both the Leaderboard and the Cup:

Position Contest Coding Cup Leaderboard
1 Paul Cleary E. Choroba
2 Isaiah Howard Paul Cleary
3 Richard Zapor wanderdoc
4 E. Choroba Mark Bishop
5 wanderdoc David Valles

And here are the top ten from a points table combining both the Leaderboard and the Cup:

Position Name Points
1 Paul Cleary 17
2 E. Choroba 15
3 wanderdoc 12
4 David Valles 10
4 Mark Bishop 10
4 Isaiah Howard 10
7 Jeff Vincent 8
8 Richard Zapor 7
9 Siegbert Steinlechner 6
10 Kathick Sundarajan 2

Once again, I apologise but also thank everyone who has participated in the contest, but I am unable to continue running the competition.

Thank you for your understanding, Lewis Cornwall.

Happy Anniversary!


This week officially marks the first anniversary of contestcoding!

Considering that the 8th March is the anniversary of contestcoding, find the next time time the anniversary of contestcoding will be on a Saturday.

Remember, to solve this puzzle and appear on the leaderboard, email both your solution and your source code (in any language) to lewiscornwall13@gmail.com. Good luck!!

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The Magic 7


The Fibonacci sequence is defined as follows: The first two terms are 0 and 1 respectively, with each subsequent term being the sum of the previous two (0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 etc). A Fibonacci number is a number which appears in the Fibonacci sequence. Find the third digit of the smallest Fibonacci number which has a first digit of 7.

Remember, to solve this puzzle and appear on the leaderboard, email both your solution and your source code (in any language) to lewiscornwall13@gmail.com. Good luck!!

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Winning Wimbledon


In a (sudden death deuce) grand slam tennis match you must win 3 sets before your opponent, where the winner of each set is the first to 6 games, unless the score is 5-5, in which case you must win by 7-5 or if the score gets to 6-6, the winner is decided by a first to 7 point tiebreak (assume you can win a tiebreak 7-6). The winner of each game is the first player to 4 points (assume you you can win a game 4-3). Because of the rules of tennis, it is possible to win more points in a match and still lose. At Wimbledon, you must win 7 matches to take the title. Find the minimum possible percentage of points won to win Wimbledon, using the scoring system above.

Remember, to solve this puzzle and appear on the leaderboard, email both your solution and your source code (in any language) to lewiscornwall13@gmail.com. Good luck!!

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